Doctors Hospital at Renaissance Endoscopy - Digestive Disorders

Procedures

ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURES

GASTROSCOPY
Examination of the inside of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum using a thin, flexible fiberscope that is passed through the mouth. It enables the doctor to see if there is any damage to the lining of the esophagus or stomach and if there are any ulcers in the stomach or duodenum. The procedure is painless and is usually done under a light sedative. It takes about 10 to 15 minutes.
 
COLONOSCOPY
Examination of the entire colon using an elongated flexible colonoscope. A colonoscope is used to evaluate lining of colon and detect and remove polyps. The procedure usually takes 15 to 20 minutes. Sedatives are given to help patients relax and better tolerate any discomfort.
 
ENDOSCOPIC RETROGRADE CHOLANGIO PANCREATOGRAPHY (ERCP) ERCP is a technique that combines the use of endoscopy and fluoroscopy to diagnose and treat certain problems of the biliary or pancreatic systems. Through the endoscope, the physician can see the opening of the biliary system and injects dye into the ducts in the biliary tree so they can be seen under fluoro. ERCP is used primarily to diagnose and treat conditions of the bile ducts, including biliary stones, inflammatory strictures (scars), leaks (from trauma and surgery), and cancer. It is also used to evaluate diseases of the pancreas.
 
ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND (EUS) combines endoscopy and ultrasound in order to obtain images and information about the digestive tract and the surrounding tissue and organs. Endoscopy refers to the procedure of inserting a long flexible tube via the mouth or the rectum to visualize the digestive tract, whereas ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to produce images of the organs and structures inside the body. Common uses of EUS are:
  • Staging of cancers of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas and rectum.
  • Staging of lung cancer.
  • Evaluating chronic pancreatitis and other masses or cysts of the pancreas.
  • Studying bile duct abnormalities including stones in the bile duct or gallbladder, or bile duct, gallbladder, or liver tumors.
  • Studying the muscles of the lower rectum and anal canal in evaluating reasons for fecal incontinence.
  • Studying 'submucosal lesions' such as nodules or 'bumps' that may be hiding in the intestinal wall covered by normal appearing lining of the intestinal tract.
EUS is performed with sedation so you will not be able to return to work or to drive for 24 hours. It also means that you will need someone to take you home as this is usually an out-patient procedure.
You will need to have an empty stomach that means no oral intake for 6 or more hours. In case of a rectal EUS you will probably need to take some enemas or laxatives. In either case, full instructions will be given to you.
 
ANAL-RECTAL ULTRASOUND is an examination using high frequency sound waves to create images of tissue layers beneath the surface of the anal canal or surface of the rectum.  During an anal ultrasound, a smooth probe the size of a finger is placed in the anus. This test is used to map out anal fistulas before surgery, and to look for lesions, tears, or scarring in the sphincter muscles. During a rectum ultrasound, a probe is put into the rectum through the anal opening. A small amount of fluid is put into the tip of the probe so that the surface of the probe is touching the inside of the rectum. This allows for better visualization of the tissue. Both are safe painless procedures and no radiation is used.

24-hour pH probe

The 24-hour pH probe measures how often stomach acid enters the esophagus. This procedure also measures how long the acid stays in the stomach.

Barrx Halo Ablation

Barrx Halo Ablation is a newer treatment for Barrett’s Esophagus with Dysplasia, using radiofrequency ablation. The procedure is also referred to as Barrx or Halo Ablation.

Duodenal Stent

A duodenal stent is conducted when a patient has a blockage in the duodenum. The procedure is performed by placing a narrow metal mesh tube across the blockage and gently expanding the tube to hold open the narrowing at the outlet of the duodenum.

Capsule Endoscopy

After ingesting a pill containing a camera, PillCam or M2A capsule endoscopy allows the physician to examine the lining of the small intestine by reviewing multiple pictures obtained as the camera pill is ingested.

SpyGlass Visualization (Biliary & Pancreatic Ducts)

The SpyGlass Direct Visualization System is designed to provide a direct intraluminal view of the biliary and pancreatic ducts. This system directs therapeutic devices to treat biliary stones or to obtain biopsies.

Biliary Stent

A biliary stent is conducted when a patient has a blockage in the common bile duct. The procedure is performed by placing a narrow metal mesh or plastic tube across the blockage and gently expanding the tube to hold open the narrowing at the outlet of the common bile duct.

Esophageal Stent

An esophageal stent is conducted when a patient has a blockage in the esophagus. The procedure is performed by placing a narrow metal mesh tube across the blockage and gently expanding open the esophagus.

Endoscopic Ultrasound

Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) allows the physician to examine the esophagus and stomach lining, as well as the walls of the upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The upper GI tract consists of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum; the lower GI tract includes the colon and rectum. EUS is also used to study other organs that are near the gastrointestinal tract, including the lungs, liver, gall bladder and pancreas, by obtaining specimens using needle aspiration.

Colonic Stent

A colonic stent is conducted when a patient has a blockage in the colon. The procedure is performed by placing a narrow metal or mesh tube across the blockage and gently expanding the tube to hold open the narrowing of the colon.

Anal-rectal Ultrasound

An anal-rectal ultrasound is an examination using high-frequency sound waves to create images of tissue layer beneath the surface of the rectum and anal canal. This test is used to map out anal fistulas before surgery, and to look for lesions, tears, or scarring in the sphincter muscles. It is a safe, painless procedure.

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in Provider Agreements
final rule, Doctors Hospital at Renaissance, Ltd is disclosing that it is seeking an expansion
exception under Section 6001 of the Affordable Care Act of 2010.

Doctors Hospital at Renaissance proudly meets the federal definition of a “physician-owned hospital” (42 CFR § 489.3).
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